Many opportunities remain unused!

by Dieter Schwab

(The vacuum press guru)

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Beschichtungsmöglichkeiten
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Creative surfaces

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3D mosaic

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Waste wood

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Veneer

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Paper / fabric

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High-gloss HPL

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Ribbed rubber

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Stainless steel

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Patina metal

After many years on the market and in many minds, the vacuum press continues to be a machine for the manufacture of moulded parts. This is undoubtedly the supreme discipline of this machine. However, reducing it to this application gives away the huge range of other possible applications of this machine.

Vacuuming the air below the membrane creates a pressure difference to the outside ambient air pressure. The ambient air presses from the outside on the membrane. The membrane passes this pressure on to the workpiece. The membrane only has a sealing function between the higher ambient air pressure and the reduced inner pressure. This results in the captivating property of this machine. Always the same pressing force per cm² regardless of the size, shape or thickness of the workpiece. As a result, the vacuum press is perfectly suited for the flat pressing of uneven materials such as waste wood or split wood boards.

Especially for sensitive coating materials like HPL, the vacuum press offers unbeatable advantages. Anyone who has to process high-gloss laminate in a conventional veneer press knows that every chip, every grain of dust, adhesive tape or glue residue on the press plates inevitably leads to imprints in the finished surface. This problem is due to the system-related nature of the panel presses as they press all elevations until they are flush with the rest of the pressing surface. This is where the vacuum press has its unbeatable advantages. As previously described, the pressure of a vacuum press is always the same. In practice, this means for the user that it is not important for the pressing result, whether glue residues are on the membrane, adhesive tapes were used for fixing or chips are lying on the workpiece.
Even pieces of cloth that are placed to protect the membranes from the sharp HPL edges do not cause any marks. The feature that vacuum lowers the boiling point of water adds to the above benefits. When using oil-lubricated vacuum pumps, this effect is so strong that pressing times comparable to heated veneer presses can be achieved without the use of energy-intensive heating. A veneer press consumes on average 12 – 15 kW while a vacuum press does the same job with 0.1 – 0.15 kW.

Use the benefits of vacuum technology for your creativity!